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Past Colloquia

Comets, unseen planets, and interstellar visitors

Zoom

Scott Tremaine, University of Toronto

September 23, 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comets have inspired awe since prehistoric times, but even today there are only a few thousand comets with well-determined orbits. Nevertheless, the analysis of this limited sample yields a compelling model for the formation, evolution and present distribution of comets. This model implies that the…

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“Measuring the Largest Structures in the Universe with the Smallest Telescopes in Space”

Zoom

Michael Zemcov, Rochester Institute of Technology

September 16, 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Observational astrophysics has frequently been driven by the desire for ever increasing angular resolution, which has resulted in larger and more expensive telescopes with time. However, telescopes with very small apertures can sometimes perform cosmological measurements as important as their larger siblings. In this talk,…

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Colloquium with Adrian Price-Whelan

Cody Hall, AB 107, University of Toronto

Adrian Price-Whelan, Flatiron Institute

April 22, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

More information coming soon…

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Colloquium with Sarah Burke-Spolaor

Cody Hall, AB 107, University of Toronto

Sarah Burke-Spolaor, West Virginia University

April 15, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

More information coming soon.

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Colloquium with Michael Zemcov

Cody Hall, AB 107, University of Toronto

Michael Zemcov, Rochester Institute of Technology

April 08, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

More information coming soon.

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A night at high speed: exploring the minute-cadence sky with the Evryscopes

Cody Hall, AB 107

Nick Law

March 25, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

The Evryscopes are array telescopes that cover the entire visible sky in each and every exposure. Based in the mountains of Chile and California, the systems together take a 1.3 Gigapixel image of the sky every two minutes, reaching depths of 16th magnitude in each…

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Colloquium with Jay Strader

Cody Hall, AB 107, University of Toronto

Jay Strader

March 18, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

More information coming soon…

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Light Echoes of Eta Carinae, Massive Star Mergers, and Pre-Supernova Eruptions

Cody Hall, AB 107, University of Toronto

Nathan Smith, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona

March 11, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Eta Carinae is the most massive and most luminous evolved star known in the Local Group, and it provides a glimpse of the violent phases of eruptive mass loss that can occur in unstable massive stars before they die.  Despite a wealth of high-quality data…

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The Formation of Binary Stars and Planets

Cody Hall, AB 107

Maxwell Moe, University of Arizona

February 26, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

The majority of solar-type stars are born in binaries, and therefore star and planet formation must be examined in the context of stellar multiples. I will first highlight the hurdles in standard migration models of close binaries and hot Jupiters.  Although the majority of close…

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Students Doing Astronomy Like Astronomers: Teaching Astronomy Through Observation and Modelling

Cody Hall, AB 107, University of Toronto

Pierre Chastenay, UQAM

January 15, 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

How do young people learn science? What to do about their naïve conceptions? How can we better support them in learning scientific concepts? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this colloquium, which will focus more specifically on teaching basic astronomical…

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