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Past Colloquia

The chemo-dynamical structure of the Milky Way

Cody Hall

Jo Bovy (IAS)

February 03, 2014
14:00 - 15:00

Observations of the structure and dynamics of different stellar populations in the Milky Way’s disk provide a unique perspective on disk formation, evolution, and dynamics. I will review our current knowledge of the chemo-orbital structure of the disk and its implications for our understanding of…

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Baryonic physics in galaxy evolution as seen by the CALIFA survey

Cody Hall

Jakob Walcher (Potsdam)

January 31, 2014
14:00 - 15:00

Ironically, while the predictions on the dark side of the cosmological “concordance” model LambdaCDM are well understood theoretically, many open questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution revolve around the difficult physics of the luminous, baryonic matter. The Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA)…

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Terrestrial Aftermath of Moon-forming Impact to Plate tectonics and habitability

Reichman Family Lecture Hall (ES1050)

Norman Sleep (Stanford)

January 24, 2014
14:00 - 15:00

Earth’s mantle was mostly molten after the Moon-forming impact. We assume that Earth had total CO2 and water inventories comparable to the modern ones. These volatiles entered the atmosphere, which soon became opaque and radiated at the runaway greenhouse threshold. The Moon caused strong Earth…

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Assessing the Role of Stellar Feedback from Small to Large Scales

Cody Hall

Laura Lopez (MIT)

January 22, 2014
14:00 - 15:00

Stellar feedback has a profound influence in many astrophysical phenomena, yet it is often cited as one of the biggest uncertainties in galaxy formation models today. This uncertainty stems from a dearth of observational constraints as well as the great dynamic range between the small…

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Galaxy Kinematics through Integral Field Spectroscopy

Cody Hall

David Law (Dunlap Institute)

January 15, 2014
14:00 - 15:00

In the young universe, galaxies were blobby conglomerations of stars whose irregular structures were products of their dynamically violent environments.  Over time, star formation in these systems declined as the gas fraction dropped, and galaxies evolved into the spiral and elliptical structures with which we…

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Radio Polarimetry and the Magnetic Universe

Cody Hall

Bryan Gaensler (CAASTRO / The University of Sydney)

January 10, 2014
14:00 - 15:00

A remarkable discovery made by 20th century astronomers was that the Universe is threaded with magnetic fields. Furthermore, these magnetic fields typically do not have a random, tangled, morphology, but are surprisingly organised and coherent. However, the processes that create and then sustain this large-scale…

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Resolving Black Holes with the Event Horizon Telescope

Cody Hall

Shep Doeleman (MIT Haystack & Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)

December 20, 2013
14:00 - 15:00

A convergence of high bandwidth radio instrumentation and newly accessible mm and submm wavelength facilities are enabling assembly of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT): a short-wavelength Very Long Baseline interferometry (VLBI) array with the capability of observing the nearest supermassive black holes with Schwarzschild Radius…

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Karl W. Kamper Memorial Lecture – Nearby Galaxy Mergers Seen with Adaptive Optics: A Sharper Image

Cody Hall

Claire E. Max (CfAO, UC Observatories)

December 06, 2013
14:00 - 15:00

Adaptive Optics is a technology that detects and corrects changing distortions in optical systems.  It has been applied to great effect during the past decade for correcting astronomical telescopes for blurring due to turbulence in the Earth’s atmosphere. This talk will describe how Adaptive Optics works,…

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CMB Polarization with the South Pole Telescope

Cody Hall

Duncan Hanson (McGill)

November 29, 2013
14:00 - 15:00

Measurements of polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are our best hope to measure the amplitude and scale of gravity waves in the early Universe. They also have the power to provide an (astrophysical) determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale. For the past…

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A Thermometer for Goldilocks: Accurate Temperatures of Kepler M Dwarfs and Their Planets

Cody Hall

Eric Gaidos (Hawaii)

November 22, 2013
14:00 - 15:00

M dwarf stars are especially attractive targets in the search for Earth-like planets because small planets are easier to detect around such stars, and the “habitable zone” is closer to the star where planets are more readily detected. The Kepler mission has discovered Earth-size planets…

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