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Photo of Jessica Campbell (she/her)
Supervisor: Bryan Gaensler Galactic magnetism using radio polarization and 21 cm HI; interstellar extinction using optical and IR photometry.
Website: http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~campbell

Biographical Info

My thesis work is focused on understanding the magnetic properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) within our Galaxy. In particular, I am interested in understanding how the Galactic magnetic field connects between different phases and spatial scales within the ISM. I am also interested in interstellar extinction in star forming regions where the ISM is primarily molecular. To do this, I am using optical and infrared photometry to study stellar extinction curves within a nearby giant molecular cloud with the goal of more accurately characterizing the ISM dust properties.

Categories: Graduate Students
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Photo of Ray Carlberg
Professor N-body modelling, galactic dynamics, cosmology.Ph. D. 1978, British Columbia
Work Phone: 416-978-2198/3150 Website: http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~carlberg/

Biographical Info

I am primarily interested in cosmology and galaxy formation and evolution using both observational and theoretical approaches. Recently I was one of the leaders of the Supernova Legacy Survey which found that the dark energy was constant in time to a precision of better than 10%, consistent with Einstein’s cosmological constant. I am also interested in star streams as indicators of the dark matter substructure of the Milky Way halo. I was the Thirty Meter Telescope’s Canadian Project Director 2003-17.
Categories: Faculty
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Photo of Tomas Cassanelli (he/him)
Supervisor: Keith Vanderlinde Long wavelength instrumentation
Categories: Graduate Students
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Photo of Victor Chan (he/him)
Supervisor: Renée Hložek Cosmology, Cosmic Microwave Background, Data modeling and analysis
Website: http://astro.utoronto.ca/~chan/
Categories: Graduate Students
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Categories: Graduate Students
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Photo of Seery Chen
Supervisor:
Website: http://astro.utoronto.ca/~schen/
Categories: Graduate Students
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Categories: Graduate Students
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Photo of Christine Clement
Professor, Emeritus Variable stars in globular clusters and other stellar systems.Ph.D. 1967, Toronto
Work Phone: 416-978-2204 Website: http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~cclement/
Categories: Emeritus Faculty
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Photo of Maurice J. Clement
Professor, Emeritus Equilibrium and stability of rotating stellar models, circulation and mixing in stellar interiors.Ph.D. 1965, Chicago
Work Phone: 416-978-2204 Website: http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~mclement/
Categories: Emeritus Faculty
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Photo of Daven Cocroft
Supervisor:
Website: http://astro.utoronto.ca/~cocroft/
Categories: Graduate Students
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Photo of Amanda Cook
Supervisor:
Website: http://astro.utoronto.ca/~cook/
Categories: Graduate Students
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Photo of Abigail T Crites
Assistant Professor, DADDAA & Dunlap Observational cosmology, astronomical instrumentation, [CII] intensity mapping, epoch of reionization, cosmic microwave background.Ph.D. 2013, Chicago
Work Phone: 416-946-7291 Website: https://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/~abigail.crites

Biographical Info

My research is focused on investigating the early universe ( < 1 billion years after the Big Bang) through development and use of mm-wavelength instruments. These instruments are deployed on telescopes to study early galaxies during the epoch of reionization and the cosmic microwave background radiation. Measurements with these instruments will significantly enhance our understanding of astrophysics, fundamental physics, cosmology, and the large-scale structure of the universe.

We are currently building the Tomographic Ionized Carbon Intensity Mapping Experiment (TIME), a mm-wavelength spectrometer we are building at to study the epoch of reionization (EoR). The instrument is a 200-300 GHz spectrometer with resolving power, R, of ~ 100.TIME is a collaboration of scientist from ASIAA, Caltech, RIT, the University of Arizona, UofT.

The technique we are pursuing by building the TIME instrument, ionized carbon ([CII]) intensity mapping, is a promising approach to study the EoR, and recent instrumentation advances are enabling strides forward with these measurements. These ionized carbon ([CII]) intensity mapping measurements of faint galaxies will be highly complementary to the 21 cm measurements as well as complimentary to the measurements of the galaxies at the bright end of the luminosity function with ALMA, HST, and JWST. Together these cutting-edge instruments will start to create a picture of this largely unexplored epoch.

I am also working on the CMB-S4 project, a future facility to measure the cosmic microwave background.

Categories: Faculty
Updated 9 months ago. Return to top.