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Past Colloquia

The Virgo Cluster of Galaxies

MP134

Laura Ferrarese (National Research Council)

July 17, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

At a distance of 16.5 Mpc and with a gravitating mass of 4.2×10^14 solar masses, the Virgo Cluster is the dominant mass concentration in the local universe, the centre of the Local Supercluster, and the largest concentration of galaxies within ~35 Mpc. With thousands of…

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Listening for the Echoes of Inflation from Antarctica

Cody Hall

Jeffrey Filippini (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

April 17, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

Our modern account of cosmic history begins with inflation, a moment of rapid expansion that established the large-scale geometry of our universe and sowed the quantum seeds of structure formation. Inflation should further have imprinted the universe with primordial gravitational waves on cosmological scales. The…

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The Future of Astronomy is Super(conducting): Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors for UVOIR Astronomy

Cody Hall

Ben Mazin (UC Santa Barbara)

April 10, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

In the last five years we have made remarkable progress in turning superconducting lumped element microwave resonators into the most powerful UV, optical, and near-IR detectors in the world.  In this talk I will describe in detail the operating principles of these detectors, called Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors, and…

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A Half-Century of Astronomy Outreach: Stories, Reflections, and Lessons Learned

Cody Hall

John Percy (University of Toronto)

March 27, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

Outreach has always been valued in our department, and the university as a whole shows signs of making it a higher priority — not just because it supports recruitment, alumni relations, fundraising, and our public image, but also because we are accountable to the public,…

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Mass assembly in star-forming clouds from filaments to disks

Cody Hall

Rachel Friesen (University of Toronto)

March 20, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

Recent surveys of dust continuum emission of Galactic star-forming regions have revealed the ubiquity of filamentary structures in molecular clouds. The prevalence of filaments within star-forming regions raises the tantalizing possibility that the star formation efficiency in molecular clouds is strongly dependent on how these…

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Revealing the gas-star formation connection over cosmic time

Cody Hall

Jacqueline Hodge (NRAO)

March 13, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

Thanks to deep surveys in the rest-frame optical/UV and color-selection techniques, the star formation history of the universe has now been constrained through the era of galaxy assembly at z~1-3 and all the way out to the epoch of reionization. Yet despite such advances, little…

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New Insights into the Interstellar Medium in our Neighbor M31

Cody Hall

Karin Sandstrom (University of Arizona)

March 06, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

As the nearest metal-rich, star-forming galaxy to the Milky Way, M31 plays a key role in understanding the interstellar medium (ISM) and star formation at z~0. Because of its proximity, we can study the properties of the ISM on the scale of individual star-forming molecular…

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Double Feature: “SZ with AGN” and “The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor”

Cody Hall

Tobias Marriage (Princeton)

February 13, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

Part 1: Evidence is mounting that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are responsible for the lack of star-formation in the most massive galaxies. Attention has been drawn to the role of energetic radio-mode feedback from the AGN in heating the gas around massive halos and preventing…

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Exotic Supernovae and Tidal Disruption Events from the Pan-STARRS1 Survey

Cody Hall

Ryan Chornock (Ohio University)

February 06, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

The Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) project was a five-band optical survey of the northern sky that recently finished operations after taking data for more than four years. One of the primary scientific drivers was to perform a deep time-domain survey of ten 7 sq. deg. fields. Our…

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Extrasolar Weather and Dust: on the Occurrence of Great Red Spots and Asteroid Belts

Cody Hall

Stanimir Metchev (The University of Western Ontario)

January 30, 2015
14:00 - 15:00

The detection of global weather phenomena in irradiated extrasolar hot Jupiters has provided tremendous insights into their atmospheric structure. Non-irradiated substellar atmospheres probe weather in an entirely different regime, where global atmospheric flows result primarily from a combination of rapid rotation and internal convection –…

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